Monthly Archives: May 2013

How to define a writer? Writers are this:

Reblogged from Creative Writing with the Crimson League:

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As I get “The King’s Sons” ready for publication at the end of the month (yikes!) and put together my writer’s handbook, “Writing for You: A Novelist’s Guide to the Craft of Fiction,” I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about the things that define us as writers. As novelists. As wordsmiths.

I think most writers have a lot of characteristics in common.

Read more… 534 more words

How to define a writer? Writers are this:

Reblogged from Creative Writing with the Crimson League:

Click to visit the original post

As I get “The King’s Sons” ready for publication at the end of the month (yikes!) and put together my writer’s handbook, “Writing for You: A Novelist’s Guide to the Craft of Fiction,” I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about the things that define us as writers. As novelists. As wordsmiths.

I think most writers have a lot of characteristics in common.

Read more… 534 more words

Review: DEAD HEAT by Bronwyn Parry

Reblogged from Fair Dinkum Crime:

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I am not a fan of the relatively modern trend towards narrower and narrower ‘genrefication’ of fiction because I believe it repels more readers than it attracts (though I’ll admit this is based on anecdotal and experiential evidence rather than the scientific kind). For example, my expectations that something with the ‘romantic suspense’ label would be too mushy for my tastes has put me off reading anything by Australian author Bronwyn Parry until, fuelled by a personal goal to read at least a smattering of books I wouldn’t otherwise read as part of my participation in the…

Read more… 577 more words

Review: DEAD HEAT by Bronwyn Parry

Reblogged from Fair Dinkum Crime:

Click to visit the original post
  • Click to visit the original post

I am not a fan of the relatively modern trend towards narrower and narrower ‘genrefication’ of fiction because I believe it repels more readers than it attracts (though I’ll admit this is based on anecdotal and experiential evidence rather than the scientific kind). For example, my expectations that something with the ‘romantic suspense’ label would be too mushy for my tastes has put me off reading anything by Australian author Bronwyn Parry until, fuelled by a personal goal to read at least a smattering of books I wouldn’t otherwise read as part of my participation in the…

Read more… 577 more words

Tweets and Treats

Reblogged from Faith Andrews:

In the last few days I’ve devoured two books that just need to be added to everyone’s to be read list, like now. Collide by Gail McHugh and Falling into You by Jasinda Wilder.

I usually get all pissy and down on my own unseasoned writing when I read incredible books like these, but thanks to Twitter and two really awesome, friendly authors I’m feeling…

Read more… 469 more words

Tweets and Treats

Reblogged from Faith Andrews:

In the last few days I’ve devoured two books that just need to be added to everyone’s to be read list, like now. Collide by Gail McHugh and Falling into You by Jasinda Wilder.

I usually get all pissy and down on my own unseasoned writing when I read incredible books like these, but thanks to Twitter and two really awesome, friendly authors I’m feeling…

Read more… 469 more words

Book Review: What is the What by Dave Eggers

Reblogged from bookboodle:

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What’s it about?

What is the What is the story of a man, who, as a boy, was separated from his family in Sudan’s brutal civil war; who trekked across Africa’s punishing wilderness with thousands of other children; who survived arial bombardment and attacks by the militias and wild animals; who ate whatever he could find or nothing at all; who, as a boy, considered ending his life to end the suffering; and who eventually made it to America, where a new and equally challenging journey began.

Read more… 674 more words

Book Review: What is the What by Dave Eggers

Reblogged from bookboodle:

Click to visit the original post

What’s it about?

What is the What is the story of a man, who, as a boy, was separated from his family in Sudan’s brutal civil war; who trekked across Africa’s punishing wilderness with thousands of other children; who survived arial bombardment and attacks by the militias and wild animals; who ate whatever he could find or nothing at all; who, as a boy, considered ending his life to end the suffering; and who eventually made it to America, where a new and equally challenging journey began.

Read more… 674 more words

Self publishing hints and tips

Reblogged from tortoisesoup:

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In my last post I took a brief look at self publishing and how it has become an increasingly viable option for the modern writer. Self publishing, also known as indy publishing, has become a boom industry but many writers are still a bit unsure of how to do it and what the benefits are.

I was contacted this week by a budding writer on Twitter.

Read more… 1,161 more words

Self publishing hints and tips

Reblogged from tortoisesoup:

Click to visit the original post

In my last post I took a brief look at self publishing and how it has become an increasingly viable option for the modern writer. Self publishing, also known as indy publishing, has become a boom industry but many writers are still a bit unsure of how to do it and what the benefits are.

I was contacted this week by a budding writer on Twitter.

Read more… 1,161 more words